Categories
Covid-19 U. S. News

White House to Spend $10 Billion to Bolster Vaccine Effor

The White House announced Thursday that it is dedicating another $10 billion to try to drive up vaccination rates in low-income, minority and rural enclaves throughout the country.

The effort, which is funded through the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package passed earlier this month, will include $6 billion in funding for community health centers to expand COVID-19 vaccinations, testing and other preventive health care for populations at higher risk for the virus.

President Joe Biden’s administration, which will start distributing the money in April to nearly 1,400 centers across the country, said health centers can also use the funding to modify and improve infrastructure and add mobile units.

In addition, the Biden administration said it is allotting $3 billion to bolster “vaccine confidence.” The money, which will be parceled out to 64 jurisdictions, can be used by rural, faith-based organizations and by food assistance and housing nonprofits in high-poverty communities to conduct door-to-door outreach and education efforts to urge eligible people to schedule vaccination appointments.

Some of the funding will also be spent to help dialysis clinics provide COVID-19 vaccinations to people receiving dialysis and health care personnel in the clinics.

About $300 million is earmarked for community health worker services to support COVID-19 prevention and control, and an additional $32 million is for training, technical assistance and evaluation, the White House said.

The coronavirus pandemic has killed more than 545,000 people in the United States, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 31 COVID deaths, 2,895 cases. Hospitalizations drop below 2,000.

Statewide coronavirus hospitalizations in New Jersey have fallen below 2,000 for the first time in slightly more than a month as officials on Thursday reported another 2,895 confirmed cases and an additional 31 confirmed deaths in the state.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the update during an unrelated event in Iselin and once again expressed cautious optimism the third wave of the pandemic may be starting to wane in the Garden State.

“I think we’re winning this one,” Murphy said during a radio interview Thursday afternoon on WCBS 880-AM. “And it’ll be slower than maybe we’d like, but we’re gonna get there.”

Murphy also reiterated he will have information next week on another round of reopening steps over the coming weeks, though he declined to provide more detail. He has said any steps would be incremental.

”We’re going through a fairly significant list of moves here,” he told reporters after Thursday’s event. “We just need to make sure our health numbers continue to go in the right direction. Hospitalizations going below 2,000 today is a very good, positive milestone.”
Still, Murphy also warned the state is “beginning to see” hesitancy among residents cause demand for the vaccine to slow. He said the state is brainstorming ways to “proactively reach” into communities to drum up support for the vaccine — including possibly using mobile units, public service announcements, working with businesses, and “maybe knocking on your door.”
New Jersey’s COVID-19 hospitalizations fell for the first time in three days, with 1,997 patients across the state’s 71 hospitals as of Wednesday night. That marks the first time since March 21 that there have been fewer than 2,000 hospitalized coronavirus patients statewide.
The state’s seven-day average for new confirmed positive tests is now 2,888, down 5% from a week ago and 14% from a month ago.
More than 2.63 million people have been fully vaccinated in the state as of Thursday — about 38% of the state’s 6.9 million adult residents. The state’s goal is to fully vaccinate 70% of its eligible adult population — about 4.7 million people — by the end of June.
Murphy said Thursday he still believes “with a fairly high degree of confidence” that the state will reach that mark even though some vaccine centers have reported dwindling demand.
But the governor added the state is hitting a critical point because the first shots need to be into arms by the end of May for that to happen with the pair of two-dose vaccines currently available.
”We are at the point we knew we would get to, and I think it’s this week — ironically, because this is the week we opened it up for everybody — where we knew we would have to take a series of proactive steps to reach into communities,” Murphy said. “It’s here and now.”
In all, more than 6.31 million vaccine doses have been administered in New Jersey, with more than 3.92 million people receiving at least one dose.
The state’s rate of transmission remained at 0.93 on Thursday, the same as the day before. The rate had dropped steadily in recent weeks after reaching 1.07 on April 5. Any number over 1 indicates that the outbreak is growing, with each new case leading to at least one other case. A declining transmission rate means the spread is slowing.
The statewide positivity rate for tests conducted on Sunday, the most recent day available, was 10.33%. Positive tests rates tend to be higher on the weekends when fewer tests are conducted. The percent positivity on weekdays last week ranged between 7.5% and 8.5%.
In all, New Jersey has now reported 868,541 confirmed coronavirus cases out of nearly 13.1 million PCR tests in the nearly 14 months since the state reported its first case on March 4, 2020. There have also been 122,039 positive antigen tests. Those cases are considered probable, and health officials have warned that positive antigen tests could overlap with the confirmed PCR tests because they are sometimes given in tandem.
The state of 9 million people has reported 25,301 residents have died from complications related to COVID-19 — including 22,691 confirmed deaths and 2,611 fatalities considered probable. The probable deaths, which are revised weekly, increased Wednesday by 19 fatalities.
New Jersey has the most coronavirus deaths per capita among American states.
Dr. Edward Lifshitz, director of the state Department of Health’s communicable disease service, said Wednesday there’s no magic percentage of the population that needs to be vaccinated to get to herd immunity.
“The higher your overall immunity gets in the population, the more you can expect to see numbers drop,” Lifshitz said. “But there’s not going to be one exact number where we get to 50%, 52%, or 70% where you can say, ‘That’s it, we’re not going to be seeing anymore transmission.’”
Still, Lifshitz noted that the state has begun to see cases drop dramatically among the state’s oldest population, which was among the first to become eligible for the vaccine.
So far, 83% of people 65 to 79 in New Jersey have received at least one vaccine dose in New Jersey, followed by 76% of those 80 and older, 62% of those 50 to 64, 46% of those 30 to 49, 27% of those 16 to 29.
VACCINATIONS BY COUNTY
  • ATLANTIC COUNTY – 197,404 doses administered
  • BERGEN COUNTY – 704,603 doses administered
  • BURLINGTON COUNTY – 332,512 doses administered
  • CAMDEN COUNTY – 366,758 doses administered
  • CAPE MAY COUNTY – 79,365 doses administered
  • CUMBERLAND COUNTY – 85,722 doses administered
  • ESSEX COUNTY – 493,769 doses administered
  • GLOUCESTER COUNTY – 221,986 doses administered
  • HUDSON COUNTY – 390,382 doses administered
  • HUNTERDON COUNTY – 90,959 doses administered
  • MERCER COUNTY – 249,988 doses administered
  • MIDDLESEX COUNTY – 561,295 doses administered
  • MONMOUTH COUNTY – 461,877 doses administered
  • MORRIS COUNTY – 439,142 doses administered
  • OCEAN COUNTY – 371,646 doses administered
  • PASSAIC COUNTY – 296,292 doses administered
  • SALEM COUNTY – 38,898 doses administered
  • SOMERSET COUNTY – 260,836 doses administered
  • SUSSEX COUNTY – 97,321 doses administered
  • UNION COUNTY – 352,383 doses administered
  • WARREN COUNTY – 62,133 doses administered
  • UNKNOWN COUNTY – 3,515 doses administered
  • OUT OF STATE – 151,279 doses administered
HOSPITALIZATIONS
There were 1,997 patients hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Wednesday night — 117 fewer than the previous night, according to state data.
That included 457 in critical or intensive care (two more than the night before), with 245 on ventilators (three fewer).
There were also 288 COVID-19 patients discharged Wednesday, while 219 were admitted.
By comparison, hospitalizations peaked at more than 8,300 patients during the first wave of the pandemic in April and more than 3,800 during the second wave in December.
SCHOOL CASES
New Jersey has reported 254 in-school coronavirus outbreaks, which have resulted in 1,125 cases among students, teachers and school staff this academic year, according to state data.
The state defines school outbreaks as cases where contact tracers determined two or more students or school staff caught or transmitted COVID-19 in the classroom or during academic activities at school. Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
There are about 1.4 million public school students and teachers across the state, though teaching methods amid the outbreak have varied, with some schools teaching in-person, some using a hybrid format and others remaining all-remote.
Murphy has said New Jersey’s schools are expected to return to full in-person classes for the next school year.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (30.9%), followed by those 50-64 (22.7%), 18-29 (19.9%), 65-79 (10.2%), 5-17 (9.7%), 80 and older (4.4%) and 0-4 (2%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with preexisting conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (46.66%), followed by those 65-79 (32.91%), 50-64 (15.95%), 30-49 (4.06%), 18-29 (0.39%), 5-17 (0.01%) and 0-4 (0.03%).
At least 8,020 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, according to state data.
There are active outbreaks at 234 facilities, resulting in 2,836 active cases among residents and 3,675 among staffers. Those numbers have slowed as vaccinations continue at the facilities.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of early Thursday afternoon, there have been more than 144.1 million positive COVID-19 tests across the globe, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 3.06 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.
The U.S. has reported the most cases, at more than 31.87 million, and the most deaths, at more than 569,500.
Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 46 confirmed COVID deaths, 2,961 positive tests. Nearly 2.6M people fully vaccinated.

Three weeks after officials declared a third wave of the pandemic was hitting the state, New Jersey on Wednesday reported another 2,961 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and an additional 46 confirmed deaths, while more than 3 in 10 adults have been fully vaccinated in the state.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the update at his latest COVID-19 briefing in Trenton, saying that the state’s numbers are “still not where we need them to be” but have improved in the last week or so.

“They are showing a trend that is beginning to build in the right direction,” Murphy added.
Murphy also said he expects to have details next week on further easing safety restrictions in the state, though he stressed reopening will continue to be incremental and not in one fell swoop.
“We … owe people our best guess as to what it’s gonna look like for graduations, summer on the beaches, and whatnot,” the governor said.
The state’s seven-day average for new confirmed positive tests is now 2,961, down 4% from a week ago and 11% from a month ago.
Nearly 2.6 million people have been fully vaccinated in the state as of Tuesday — about 37% of the state’s 6.9 million adult residents. The state’s goal is to fully vaccinate 70% of its eligible adult population — about 4.7 million people — by the end of June.
In all, more than 6.2 million vaccine doses have been administered in New Jersey, with nearly 3.9 million people receiving at least one dose.
Hospitalizations for COVID-19 rose slightly for the second straight day, with 2,114 patients across the state’s 71 hospitals as of Tuesday night — an increase of five patients.
The state’s rate of transmission increased slightly to 0.93 after two days at 0.92. The rate had dropped steadily in recent weeks after reaching 1.07 on April 5. Any number over 1 indicates that the outbreak is growing, with each new case leading to at least one other case. A declining transmission rate means the spread is slowing.
The statewide positivity rate for tests conducted on Saturday, the most recent day available, was 10.94% based on 21,242 test. Positivity tests tend to be higher on the weekends when fewer tests are conducted. The percent positivity on weekdays last week ranged between 7.5% and 8.5%.

New Jersey has so far not come close to matching the prediction models that Murphy’s administration released last month to warn about the third wave. The models showed the state could peak at 5,445 daily cases and 2,669 people hospitalized with COVID-19 under a moderate scenario on April 18, which was Sunday. The worst-case scenario said the state could peak at 8,162 cases and 3,664 people hospitalized on May 18. But officials stressed those were just projections and that human behavior, including mask-wearing and social distancing, could prevent those scenarios from happening.

In all, New Jersey has now reported 865,733 confirmed coronavirus cases out of slightly more than 13 million PCR tests in the nearly 14 months since the state reported its first case on March 4, 2020. There have also been 121,617 positive antigen tests. Those cases are considered probable, and health officials have warned that positive antigen tests could overlap with the confirmed PCR tests because they are sometimes given in tandem.
The state of 9 million people has reported 25,271 residents have died from complications related to COVID-19 — including 22,660 confirmed deaths and 2,611 fatalities considered probable. The probable deaths, which are revised weekly, increased Wednesday by 19 fatalities.
New Jersey has the most coronavirus deaths per capita among American states.
Dr. Edward Lifshitz, director of the state Department of Health’s communicable disease service, said there’s no magic percentage of the population that needs to be vaccinated to get to herd immunity.
“The higher your overall immunity gets in the population, the more you can expect to see numbers drop,” Lifshitz said. “But there’s not going to be one exact number where we get to 50%, 52%, or 70% where you can say, ‘That’s it, we’re not going to be seeing anymore transmission.’”
Still, Lifshitz noted that the state has begun to see cases drop dramatically among the state’s oldest population, which was among the first to become eligible for the vaccine.
So far, 83% of people 65 to 79 in New Jersey have received at least one vaccine dose in New Jersey, followed by 76% of those 80 and older, 62% of those 50 to 64, 46% of those 30 to 49, 27% of those 16 to 29.
VACCINATIONS BY COUNTY
  • ATLANTIC COUNTY – 196,789 doses administered
  • BERGEN COUNTY – 697,555 doses administered
  • BURLINGTON COUNTY – 328,875 doses administered
  • CAMDEN COUNTY – 363,569 doses administered
  • CAPE MAY COUNTY – 78,903 doses administered
  • CUMBERLAND COUNTY – 85,287 doses administered
  • ESSEX COUNTY – 484,559 doses administered
  • GLOUCESTER COUNTY – 220,411 doses administered
  • HUDSON COUNTY – 385,076 doses administered
  • HUNTERDON COUNTY – 90,057 doses administered
  • MERCER COUNTY – 247,200 doses administered
  • MIDDLESEX COUNTY – 551,295 doses administered
  • MONMOUTH COUNTY – 456,207 doses administered
  • MORRIS COUNTY – 434,685 doses administered
  • OCEAN COUNTY – 367,371 doses administered
  • PASSAIC COUNTY – 292,047 doses administered
  • SALEM COUNTY – 38,705 doses administered
  • SOMERSET COUNTY – 256,967 doses administered
  • SUSSEX COUNTY – 96,130 doses administered
  • UNION COUNTY – 348,421 doses administered
  • WARREN COUNTY – 61,613 doses administered
  • UNKNOWN COUNTY – 3,465 doses administered
  • OUT OF STATE – 149,972 doses administered
COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new)
  • Essex County: 84,692 confirmed cases (368 new), 2,565 confirmed deaths (295 probable)
  • Passaic County: 63,335 confirmed cases (367 new), 1,650 confirmed deaths (195 probable)
  • Middlesex County: 83,729 confirmed cases (268 new), 2,026 confirmed deaths (246 probable)
  • Bergen County: 86,586 confirmed cases (264 new), 2,508 confirmed deaths (294 probable)
  • Hudson County: 77,617 confirmed cases (236 new), 1,989 confirmed deaths (210 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 65,967 confirmed cases (204 new), 1,421 confirmed deaths (139 probable)
  • Union County: 58,820 confirmed cases (191 new), 1,684 confirmed deaths (221 probable)
  • Ocean County: 63,964 confirmed cases (161 new), 1,927 confirmed deaths (158 probable)
  • Camden County: 46,621 confirmed cases (147 new), 1,153 confirmed deaths (98 probable)
  • Morris County: 41,166 confirmed cases (120 new), 956 confirmed deaths (249 probable)
  • Burlington County: 36,978 confirmed cases (100 new), 759 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 25,393 confirmed cases (97 new), 568 confirmed deaths (30 probable)
  • Mercer County: 30,761 confirmed cases (88 new), 877 confirmed deaths (43 probable)
  • Somerset County: 23,520 confirmed cases (70 new), 711 confirmed deaths (106 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 24,162 confirmed cases (64 new), 610 confirmed deaths (35 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 13,970 confirmed cases (47 new), 380 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Salem County: 5,201 confirmed cases (47 new), 162 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Warren County: 8,444 confirmed cases (37 new), 205 confirmed deaths (25 probable)
  • Sussex County: 11,156 confirmed cases (34 new), 223 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 8,504 confirmed cases (31 new), 117 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Cape May County: 4,429 confirmed cases (16 new), 169 confirmed deaths (30 probable)
HOSPITALIZATIONS
There were 2,114 patients hospitalized with confirmed (1,961) or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Tuesday night — five more than the previous night, according to state data.
That included 455 in critical or intensive care (three more than the night before), with 248 on ventilators (six fewer).
There were also 262 COVID-19 patients discharged Tuesday, while 263 new patients were admitted.
By comparison, hospitalizations peaked at more than 8,300 patients during the first wave of the pandemic in April and more than 3,800 during the second wave in December.
SCHOOL CASES
New Jersey has reported 245 in-school coronavirus outbreaks, which have resulted in 1,094 cases among students, teachers and school staff this academic year, according to state data.
The state defines school outbreaks as cases where contact tracers determined two or more students or school staff caught or transmitted COVID-19 in the classroom or during academic activities at school. Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
There are about 1.4 million public school students and teachers across the state, though teaching methods amid the outbreak have varied, with some schools teaching in-person, some using a hybrid format and others remaining all-remote.
Murphy has said New Jersey’s schools are expected to return to full in-person classes for the next school year.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (30.9%), followed by those 50-64 (22.7%), 18-29 (19.9%), 65-79 (10.2%), 5-17 (9.7%), 80 and older (4.4%) and 0-4 (2%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with preexisting conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (46.66%), followed by those 65-79 (32.91%), 50-64 (15.95%), 30-49 (4.06%), 18-29 (0.39%), 5-17 (0.01%) and 0-4 (0.03%).
At least 8,018 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, according to state data.
There are active outbreaks at 233 facilities, resulting in 2,863 active cases among residents and 3,710 among staffers. Those numbers have slowed as vaccinations continue at the facilities.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Wednesday afternoon, there have been more than 143.2 million positive COVID-19 tests across the world, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 3.04 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.
The U.S. has reported the most cases, at more than 31.8 million, and the most deaths, at more than 569,000.
Categories
Covid-19 U. S. News

FDA inspection found problems at factory making J&J vaccine

The Baltimore factory contracted to make Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine was dirty, didn’t follow proper manufacturing procedures and had poorly trained staff, resulting in contamination of material that was going to be put in the shots, U.S. regulators said Wednesday.

The Food and Drug Administration released a statement and a 13-page report detailing findings from its recent inspection of the now-idle Emergent BioSciences factory.

Agency inspectors said a batch of bulk drug substance for J&J’s single-shot vaccine was contaminated with material used to make COVID-19 vaccines for another Emergent client, AstraZeneca. That batch, reportedly enough to make about 15 million J&J vaccine doses, had to be thrown out.

Other problems cited in the inspection report were peeling paint, black and brown residue on floors and walls in the factory, inadequate cleaning and employees not following procedures to prevent contamination.

Nothing made at the factory for J&J has been distributed, the FDA noted. The nearly 8 million doses of J&J vaccine given in the U.S. came from Europe.

Both Emergent and Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday that they are working to fix the problems as quickly as possible.

After quality problems surfaced late last month, J&J took control of the factory. The Biden administration now is working to move AstraZeneca vaccine manufacturing to another factory. AstraZeneca’s vaccine is not yet authorized in the U.S.

The Baltimore factory halted all production late last week at the request of the FDA. The agency hasn’t given emergency approval to the factory, which is needed before any vaccine material made there can be distributed.

All the bulk vaccine substance Emergent has made, plus early batches made there and then put in vials and packaged by other J&J contractors, are being stored and will undergo additional testing by the FDA, the agency said.

“We are doing everything we can to ensure that the COVID-19 vaccines that are given to the people of this nation have met the agency’s high standards for quality, safety and effectiveness,” the FDA said.

At the moment, use of the J&J vaccine is on hold in the U.S. as government health officials investigate its possible connection to very rare blood clots. Their decision on whether to allow the vaccine to be given could come Friday.

On Tuesday, the European Medicines Agency’s safety committee said its review found the blood clots are a very rare side effect but that the J&J vaccine’s benefits outweigh that risk.

Emergent, a little-known drug manufacturing contractor, was granted a major role in the Trump administration’s response to the coronavirus. The company has been repeatedly cited by the FDA for problems ranging from poorly trained employees to cracked vials and mold around one of its facilities, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.

FDA inspectors started checking the Emergent factory in Baltimore on April 12 and finished their investigation on Tuesday.

The inspectors reviewed security camera footage that showed employees carrying unsealed bags of medical waste around in the factory, with the bags touching materials ready to be used to make vaccine batches. The footage also showed employees moving between manufacturing areas for the two vaccines without documenting whether they changed protective gowns and showered in between, as required.

The inspection report noted that Emergent didn’t sufficiently investigate the contamination of the later-discarded J&J batch and didn’t appear to have done any extra cleaning after the contamination was discovered.

“There is no assurance that other batches have not been subject to cross-contamination,” the report stated.

It also noted that the factory had inadequate procedures for assuring that the vaccine substance met all quality and purity requirements.

It’s unclear how long it will take the companies to resolve all the problems at the factory, known as Bayview.

J&J has pledged to provide 100 million doses for the U.S. by the end of May and 1 billion doses globally by the end of the year.

“Right now, we can’t speculate on any potential impact this could have on the timing of our vaccine deliveries,” J&J said in a statement.

 

Categories
Covid-19 State News

13 deaths, 2,765 cases of COVID announced as N.J. prepares to open vaccine eligiblity

New Jersey health officials on Sunday reported another 2,765 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and an additional 13 confirmed deaths as the state prepares to open vaccine eligibility to all adults.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the latest figures on social media.

More than 1 in 3 adults in the state — 2,476,998 — are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, while 3,777,441 have received at least one dose as of Saturday morning, according to the state. Vaccine eligibility expands on Monday to anyone 16 or older who lives, works or studies in New Jersey.

The state’s rate of transmission on Sunday held steady from 0.91 on Saturday, down from a recent peak of 1.07 on April 5. Any number over 1 indicates that the outbreak is growing, with each new case leading to at least one other case. A declining transmission rate means the spread is slowing.

In all, New Jersey has now reported 858,519 confirmed coronavirus cases out of more than 12.9 million PCR tests since the state reported its first case on March 4, 2020. There have also been 120,334 positive antigen tests. Those cases are considered probable, and health officials have warned that positive antigen tests could overlap with the confirmed PCR tests because they are sometimes given in tandem.
The state of 9 million people has reported 25,143 deaths from complications related to COVID-19 — including 22,551 confirmed deaths and 2,592 fatalities considered probable.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

There were 2,095 patients hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Thursday night — 90 fewer than the previous night. More recent data from the weekend was not available on Sunday.
That figure included 446 in critical or intensive care (10 fewer than the night before), with 247 on ventilators (six fewer).
There were also 299 COVID-19 patients discharged Thursday.
The number of people being treated has ticked down for nearly a week.

By comparison, hospitalizations peaked at more than 8,300 patients during the first wave of the pandemic last April.

SCHOOL CASES
New Jersey has reported 245 in-school coronavirus outbreaks, which have resulted in 1,094 cases among students, teachers and school staff this academic year, according to the state’s dashboard.
The state defines school outbreaks as cases where contact tracers determined two or more students or school staff caught or transmitted COVID-19 in the classroom or during academic activities at school. Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
Teaching methods amid the outbreak have varied for the 1.4 million public school students and teachers across the state, with some schools teaching in-person, some using a hybrid format and others remaining all-remote.
Murphy recently announced most New Jersey schools can move classroom desks three feet apart, instead of six feet, under new social distancing guidelines.
The governor also said the state’s schools will return to full in-person classes for the next school year and districts will not be allowed to offer virtual learning, even for parents who want that option due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. But Murphy clarified that students and teachers who have health issues that could put them at greater risk of a serious coronavirus case will have a virtual option.

AGE BREAKDOWN

Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (30.9%), followed by those 50-64 (22.7%), 18-29 (19.9%), 65-79 (10.2%), 5-17 (9.6%), 80 and older (4.5%) and 0-4 (2%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with preexisting conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (46.66%), followed by those 65-79 (32.91%), 50-64 (15.95%), 30-49 (4.06%), 18-29 (0.39%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.03%).
At least 7,989 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
There are active outbreaks at 225 facilities, resulting in 3,676 active cases among residents and 4,366 among staffers. Those numbers have been slowing as vaccinations continue at the facilities.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Sunday, there have been more than 140 million positive COVID-19 tests across the world, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 3 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.
The U.S. has reported the most cases, at more than 31.64 million, and the most deaths, at more than 567,000.
Categories
Covid-19 U. S. News

US made little progress this week preventing more COVID-19 deaths, influential forecasting team says

As health experts worry about a COVID-19 resurgence, an influential forecasting team said the country did not make significant progress against the virus this week. And it warned about Americans taking fewer safety precautions.

The forecast provided Friday by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington is nearly the same as last week’s: in the most likely scenario, 58,000 more people will die of the virus by August 1, forecasters said.

The US has been in a race to vaccinate Americans before more transmissible variants can send numbers to overwhelming levels once more.

More than 205 million COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered in the US, according to data published Saturday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 129 million people have received at least one dose and more than 82 million people have been fully vaccinated.

And though more than 30% of US adults are already fully vaccinated, experts warn that vaccine hesitancy and easing of preventative measures could keep the public from reaching the immunity levels needed to get ahead of the pandemic.

Experts have emphasized that the rare cases of adverse reactions from COVID-19 vaccines are far outweighed by the collective protection of widespread vaccination.

“The vaccines have saved thousands of lives already,” Emory University executive associate dean of medicine Dr. Carlos del Rio told CNN. “We’ve seen mortality in the US decline despite cases going up, and that’s because we’re vaccinating people.”

But as those doses are making their way into arms, distancing and mask-wearing still play an important role in the fight against the coronavirus.

“If universal mask coverage (95%) were attained in the next week, our model projects 13,000 fewer cumulative deaths,” the IHME researchers said.

But the model instead foresees people dropping mask use. “The trend toward mandate easing continues, and it appears quite possible there will be a huge behavioral rebound,” it said.

Under a worst-case scenario, 679,000 people will have died by August 1 if more people stop wearing masks and start moving around and gathering more, according to the model.

The US leads the world with more than 566,000 coronavirus deaths, with just over three million COVID-19 deaths reported globally as of Saturday morning, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Where the numbers stand now

In several parts of the US, COVID-19 cases are on the rise again.

At least 13 states have recorded at least a 10% rise in daily average positive cases of COVID-19, according to Johns Hopkins data Friday — an improvement from 21 states on Thursday — but underscoring that the fight against the pandemic is far from over.

In Michigan, hospitals are increasingly overwhelmed and reaching full capacities in part due to the influx of new cases.

Dr. Joel Fishbain, medical director for infection prevention at Beaumont Hospital in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, said many patients in hospitals now are younger than those being admitted last spring.

“The people I worry about are the nursing staff,” he told CNN. “So even though there may be open beds, we may not have the staffing to staff them… All of the nurses and the support personnel are really getting tired.”

State and local officials are attempting to avoid a similar situation and are pushing to increase vaccination levels among adults, which shows continuing signs of improvement.

“We have knocked down this virus already three times, but we have to knock it down a fourth time,” Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Thursday.

Many states are pushing harder to increase vaccination rates.

“We know that these vaccines are really responsible primarily for the 90% reduction in deaths we’ve seen over the first 13 weeks of 2021,” Dr. Clay Marsh, West Virginia’s COVID-19 czar, said Thursday.

Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Connecticut and Georgia all highlighted increases in vaccination numbers.

New York reported its lowest number of hospitalizations since December 1 and that more than half of New York adults had received at least one dose of a vaccine, according to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office.

Johnson & Johnson vaccine investigated

As vaccine distribution continues, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine remains paused as the company waits for guidance from investigators.

A severe form of blood clot in the brain known as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) may be linked to the vaccine, yet the occurrence rate is rare. So far, only six cases have been reported in the US out of the approximately 7 million doses administered to date. One person died and another is in critical condition, an FDA official said Tuesday.

One of the six cases involved a 26-year-old Pennsylvania woman, according to the state’s department of health, who recovered after receiving treatment at a hospital. The state, which is pausing J&J distribution until April 24, said that federal oversight of vaccine safety is functioning as intended.

“The safety procedures built into the vaccination process are working and should instill confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the available COVID-19 vaccines,” Pennsylvania Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam said. “I urge individuals who have appointments scheduled to receive a Pfizer or Moderna vaccination to keep those appointments.”

After the CDC and the US Food and Drug Administration recommended a pause on Tuesday, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices met Wednesday without voting on taking any further action, stating that more information is needed, and vaccine advisers to the CDC have scheduled a meeting for April 23 to determine whether additional intervention is required.

“Hopefully, we’ll get a decision quite soon as to whether or not we can get back on track with this very effective vaccine,” Dr. Anthony Fauci told a Congressional hearing Thursday.

Recipients of the vaccine who develop a severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath within three weeks after vaccination should contact their health care provider, the CDC and FDA said.

For those that received the J&J vaccine more than a month ago, the risk is “very low,” said CDC principal deputy director Dr. Anne Schuchat during a virtual briefing on Tuesday.

Researchers look into vaccinating children as young as 2

In many states, vaccinations are available for everyone 16 and older, but researchers have begun testing Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in children as young as two.

“Stanford Medicine is one of five sites nationwide participating in a Phase 1 trial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in children younger than 5 years of age,” Stanford Medicine told CNN in a statement Thursday. A Stanford Medicine spokesperson confirmed that researchers began administering doses to participants in the 2- to 5-year age group on Wednesday.

“This phase of the study, which will enroll a total of 144 participants across the country, will test three doses of the vaccine in this age group for safety and tolerability,” the statement read. “Once a safe and tolerable vaccine dose has been established, a larger study of vaccine efficacy will be launched in this age group.”

The Phase 1 study at Stanford is now fully enrolled.

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital have also begun testing the vaccine in young children. Dr. Robert Frenck, the principal investigator for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine trials at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, said Monday that the first dose was given to participants in the 2 to 4 age range last week.

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital said nearly 340 children are participating in the vaccine trials at the hospital, and more will be enrolled soon.

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 41 COVID deaths, 3,791 positive tests. Hospitalizations, transmission rate decline again.

New Jersey health officials on Friday reported another 3,791 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and an additional 41 confirmed deaths as hospitalizations and the rate of transmission continued to fall.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the latest numbers on social media. The seven-day average for new positive tests is 3,066, down 9% from a week ago and about the same as a month ago.

More than 1 in 3 adults in the state — 2,377,803 — are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, while 3,694,948 have received at least one dose as of Friday morning, according to the state. Vaccine eligibility expands on Monday to anyone 16 or older who lives, works or studies in New Jersey.

The state’s rate of transmission on Friday decreased to 0.91 from 0.92 on Thursday. It has dropped steadily from 1.07 on April 5. Any number over 1 indicates that the outbreak is growing, with each new case leading to at least one other case. A declining transmission rate means the spread is slowing.

The positivity rate for Saturday, the most recent day available, was 11.23% based on 25,301 tests. Positivity rates on weekend days tend to be higher with fewer tests conducted. The positivity rate on weekdays last week hovered between 8 and 9%.
In all, New Jersey has now reported 852,330 confirmed coronavirus cases out of more than 12.8 million PCR tests since the state reported its first case on March 4, 2020. There have also been 119,452 positive antigen tests. Those cases are considered probable, and health officials have warned that positive antigen tests could overlap with the confirmed PCR tests because they are sometimes given in tandem.
The state of 9 million people has reported 25,094 people have died from complications related to COVID-19 — including 22,502 confirmed deaths and 2,592 fatalities considered probable. The probable deaths, which are revised weekly, increased by 19 on Wednesday.
VACCINATIONS BY COUNTY
  • ATLANTIC COUNTY – 184,262 doses administered
  • BERGEN COUNTY – 652,941 doses administered
  • BURLINGTON COUNTY – 306,206 doses administered
  • CAMDEN COUNTY – 342,576 doses administered
  • CAPE MAY COUNTY – 75,131 doses administered
  • CUMBERLAND COUNTY – 80,095 doses administered
  • ESSEX COUNTY – 451,257 doses administered
  • GLOUCESTER COUNTY – 206,432 doses administered
  • HUDSON COUNTY – 354,057 doses administered
  • HUNTERDON COUNTY – 84,434 doses administered
  • MERCER COUNTY – 231,054 doses administered
  • MIDDLESEX COUNTY – 507,865 doses administered
  • MONMOUTH COUNTY – 429,155 doses administered
  • MORRIS COUNTY – 406,188 doses administered
  • OCEAN COUNTY – 347,589 doses administered
  • PASSAIC COUNTY – 269,037 doses administered
  • SALEM COUNTY – 36,225 doses administered
  • SOMERSET COUNTY – 237,844 doses administered
  • SUSSEX COUNTY – 90,329 doses administered
  • UNION COUNTY – 317,625 doses administered
  • WARREN COUNTY – 58,951 doses administered
  • UNKNOWN COUNTY – 20,968 doses administered
  • OUT OF STATE – 142,186 doses administered

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new cases)

  • Essex County: 83,084 confirmed cases (445 new), 2,551 confirmed deaths (291 probable)
  • Hudson County: 76,478 confirmed cases (382 new), 1,979 confirmed deaths (206 probable)
  • Middlesex County: 82,361 confirmed cases (374 new), 2,013 confirmed deaths (245 probable)
  • Bergen County: 85,445 confirmed cases (345 new), 2,492 confirmed deaths (294 probable)
  • Passaic County: 62,083 confirmed cases (318 new), 1,635 confirmed deaths (195 probable)
  • Camden County: 45,910 confirmed cases (252 new), 1,145 confirmed deaths (98 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 64,976 confirmed cases (239 new), 1,408 confirmed deaths (137 probable)
  • Union County: 57,885 confirmed cases (234 new), 1,673 confirmed deaths (220 probable)
  • Ocean County: 63,259 confirmed cases (194 new), 1,905 confirmed deaths (155 probable)
  • Morris County: 40,599 confirmed cases (174 new), 952 confirmed deaths (246 probable)
  • Burlington County: 36,488 confirmed cases (154 new), 752 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 24,993 confirmed cases (115 new), 563 confirmed deaths (30 probable)
  • Mercer County: 30,366 confirmed cases (106 new), 874 confirmed deaths (43 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 23,784 confirmed cases (98 new), 603 confirmed deaths (35 probable)
  • Sussex County: 10,928 confirmed cases (84 new), 222 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Somerset County: 23,145 confirmed cases (77 new), 710 confirmed deaths (105 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 13,795 confirmed cases (55 new), 377 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 8,341 confirmed cases (48 new), 116 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Warren County: 8,286 confirmed cases (41 new), 204 confirmed deaths (25 probable)
  • Salem County: 5,071 confirmed cases (37 new), 159 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Cape May County: 4,340 confirmed cases (13 new), 169 confirmed deaths (30 probable)

HOSPITALIZATIONS

There were 2,185 patients hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Thursday night — 75 fewer than the previous night.
That included 456 in critical or intensive care (four fewer than the night before), with 190 on ventilators (61 fewer).
There were also 300 COVID-19 patients discharged Thursday.
By comparison, hospitalizations peaked at more than 8,300 patients during the first wave of the pandemic in April.
SCHOOL CASES
New Jersey has reported 245 in-school coronavirus outbreaks, which have resulted in 1,094 cases among students, teachers and school staff this academic year, according to the state’s dashboard.
The state defines school outbreaks as cases where contact tracers determined two or more students or school staff caught or transmitted COVID-19 in the classroom or during academic activities at school. Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
There are about 1.4 million public school students and teachers across the state, though teaching methods amid the outbreak have varied, with some schools teaching in-person, some using a hybrid format and others remaining all-remote.

Murphy recently announced most New Jersey schools can move classroom desks three feet apart, instead of six feet, under new social distancing guidelines.

The governor also said the state’s schools will return to full in-person classes for the next school year and districts will not be allowed to offer virtual learning, even for parents who want that option due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. But Murphy clarified that students and teachers who have health issues that could put them at greater risk of a serious coronavirus case will have a virtual option.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (30.9%), followed by those 50-64 (22.9%), 18-29 (19.8%), 65-79 (10.4%), 5-17 (9.4%), 80 and older (4.6%) and 0-4 (1.9%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with preexisting conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (46.87%), followed by those 65-79 (32.89%), 50-64 (15.78%), 30-49 (4.05%), 18-29 (0.39%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.03%).
At least 7,989 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
There are active outbreaks at 225 facilities, resulting in 3,676 active cases among residents and 4,366 among staffers. Those numbers have been slowing as vaccinations continue at the facilities.
GLOBAL NUMBERS

As of Friday, there have been more than 139.3 million positive COVID-19 tests across the world, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 2.99 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.

The U.S. has reported the most cases, at more than 31.5 million, and the most deaths, at more than 565,400.
Categories
Covid-19 U. S. News

US setting up $1.7B national network to track virus variants

WASHINGTON — The U.S. is setting up a $1.7 billion national network to identify and track worrisome coronavirus mutations whose spread could trigger another pandemic wave, the Biden administration announced Friday.

White House officials unveiled a strategy that features three components: a major funding boost for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments to ramp up coronavirus gene-mapping; the creation of six “centers of excellence” partnerships with universities to conduct research and develop technologies for gene-based surveillance of pathogens, and building a data system to better share and analyze information on emerging disease threats, so knowledge can be turned into action.

“Even as we accelerate our efforts to get shots into arms, more dangerous variants are growing, causing increases in cases in people without immunity,” White House coronavirus adviser Andy Slavitt told reporters. That “requires us to intensify our efforts to quickly test for and find the genetic sequence of the virus as it spreads.”

The new effort relies on money approved by Congress as part of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief package to break what experts say is a feast-or-famine cycle in U.S. preparedness for disease threats. The coronavirus is only one example. Others pathogens have included Ebola and Zika, and respiratory viruses like SARS in 2002 and MERS in 2012, which did not become major problems in the United States. Typically, the government scrambles to counter a potential threat, but funding dries up when it recedes. The new genomic surveillance initiative aims to create a permanent infrastructure.

“It’s a transformative amount of money,” Mary Lee Watts, federal affairs director at the American Society for Microbiology, said in a recent interview. “It has the potential not only to get ahead of the current crisis, but it is going to help us in the future. This is a program that has been underfunded for years.”

The Biden administration’s move comes as a variant known as B117, which first emerged in the United Kingdom, has become the predominant strain in the U.S. In hard-hit Michigan, the more transmissible mutation accounts for more than half the cases, according to CDC data. That’s also the case in Minnesota. Vaccines are effective against the so-called U.K. variant, but other mutations circulating around the globe have shown resistance to currently available vaccines.

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Friday the U.S. is now averaging nearly 70,000 new coronavirus cases daily, up from about 53,000 just four weeks ago. Hospitalizations have been trending higher, too, and deaths were up for the third day in a row. Along with relaxed restrictions on gatherings and indoor dining, the emergence of variants that spread more easily is part of the reason for the worsening trend.

Of particular concern are two variants that for now only have a toe-hold in the U.S. They are P1, first detected in travelers from Brazil, and B1351, identified in South Africa. The reason scientists are watching those variants is that they have shown some level of resistance to antibodies, defensive proteins produced by the human body in response to vaccines or a previous infection.

“In order for us to even have the possibility of getting back to normal by the fall we need to massively scale up our genomic surveillance,” said Esther Krofah, who directs the Faster Cures initiative of the Milken Institute. “It’s the insurance program that you need to have in place not just now, not just for COVID, but going forward for other pathogens of concern.”

Genomic sequencing essentially involves mapping the DNA of an organism, the key to its unique features. It’s done by high-tech machines that can cost from several hundred thousand dollars to $1 million or more. Technicians trained to run the machines and the necessary computing capacity add to costs.

Another hurdle is getting local, state and federal labs all working together. “There are lots of cats that need to be herded,” said University of Wisconsin virologist Thomas Friedrich.

At the end of last year, the CDC and collaborating labs were completing only 116 coronavirus gene sequences a week, according to the CDC’s website. “We started in a hole,” said Slavitt.

The White House says the weekly count is now about 29,000, but experts say in a large, diverse country like the U.S. those numbers need to be much higher to keep pace with potential changes to the virus. Viruses are highly efficient at spreading, developing mutations that enable them to keep reproducing.

White House officials said the government is releasing to states and territories an initial $240 million out of $1 billion allocated to expand genomic sequencing. Another $400 million will go to launch the six research partnerships with academic institutions, dubbed Centers of Excellence in Genomic Epidemiology. Finally, $300 million will go to set up the data sharing system, which is being called the National Bioinformatics Infrastructure.

Categories
Covid-19 U. S. News

CDC reports 5,800 COVID infections in fully vaccinated people

About 5,800 people who have been vaccinated against coronavirus have become infected anyway, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells CNN.

Some became seriously ill and 74 people died, the CDC said. It said 396 — 7% — of those who got infected after they were vaccinated required hospitalization.

It’s the first indication from CDC of how effective the vaccine is in real life — and the first indication the vaccines do not protect completely against severe disease and death.

“So far, about 5,800 breakthrough cases have been reported to CDC. To date, no unexpected patterns have been identified in case demographics or vaccine characteristics,” the CDC told CNN via email.

So far, about 77 million people in the U.S. are fully vaccinated against coronavirus, according to a CNN analysis of CDC data. The CDC’s reports on breakthrough cases will lag day-to-day reports of vaccines given, so may not reflect the most current events.

It’s not unexpected to see breakthrough cases. The vaccines are not 100% effective in preventing infections and as tens of millions of people are vaccinated, more and more such cases will be reported.

Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccine was 95% effective in preventing symptomatic disease in clinical trials, and earlier this month the companies said real-life data in the U.S. shows the vaccine is more than 91% effective against disease with any symptoms for six months.

Moderna’s vaccine was 94% effective in preventing symptomatic illness in trials, and 90% effective in real life use. Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine was 66% overall globally in trials, and 72% effective at preventing disease in the U.S.

CDC will be looking for clues about who is most prone to become infected despite having been vaccinated.

“Vaccine breakthrough infections were reported among all people of all ages eligible for vaccination. However, a little over 40% of the infections were in people 60 or more years of age,” the CDC said.

Most, 65%, were female and 29% of the so-called breakthrough infections were asymptomatic. “CDC is monitoring reported cases for clustering by patient demographics, geographic location, time since vaccination, vaccine type or lot number, and SARS-CoV-2 lineage,” the CDC said.

Plus, samples from cases will be tested to see how many are caused by variants and if so, which ones.

“CDC has developed a national COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough database where state health department investigators can currently enter, store, and manage data for cases in their jurisdiction,” the CDC said.

“Vaccine breakthrough infections make up a small percentage of people who are fully vaccinated. CDC recommends that all eligible people get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as one is available to them. CDC also continues to recommend people who have been fully vaccinated should keep taking precautions in public places, like wearing a mask, staying at least six feet apart from others, avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces, and washing their hands often.”

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 27 COVID deaths, 2,079 cases. More than half of state’s adults have received 1 vaccine dose.

New Jersey health officials on Monday reported another 2,079 cases of the coronavirus and an additional 27 deaths as hospitalizations fell for a fourth consecutive day and the transmission rate remained below the key benchmark that indicates the outbreak is once again slowing.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the latest numbers during a briefing in Trenton as he highlighted the continued progress toward the goal of vaccinating 70% of the state’s adult population by the end of June. More than half of the state’s adults have received at least one dose and nearly one-third are fully vaccinated.

“To all working across the state to administer shots in arms, regardless of where you are – whether you’re a mega-site, a local health clinic, a community-based vaccination center, one of our federal pharmacy program partners, or any of the hundreds of other sites across our state – from the bottom of our hearts, we say thank you for your incredible and hard work,” said Murphy, who received his first dose on Friday.
“And to every single one of you who has raised your sleeve to be vaccinated, thank you, as well, not only for showing your faith in our vaccine efforts but for being role models for those around you,” he said.
New Jersey health facilities and vaccine centers have now administered more than 5.44 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine administered since the state’s first shot was given Dec. 15. That includes more than 3.47 million people with at least one dose and more than 2.19 million who received their second, according to state data.
The 2,079 new confirmed cases reported Monday is the lowest number of positive tests in five weeks and brings the state’s seven-day average for confirmed cases to 3,173. That’s down 18% from a week ago, but still up 8% from a month ago.
The state’s 71 hospitals reported 2,261 patients as of Sunday night, down 35 people from a day earlier. Hospitalizations remain well below the recent high of 3,873 on Dec. 22.
The state’s rate of transmission fell again Monday to .94, following a steady drop from 1.07 a week ago. Any number over 1 indicates that the outbreak is growing, with each new case leading to at least one other case. A declining transmission rate means the spread is slowing.
The positivity rate for tests conducted on Thursday, the most recent day available, was 8.39% based on 45,456 tests.
In all, New Jersey has now reported 839,114 coronavirus cases out of more than 12.6 million PCR tests since the state reported its first case on March 4, 2020. There have also been 116,852 positive antigen tests. Those cases are considered probable, and health officials have warned that positive antigen tests could overlap with the confirmed PCR tests because they are sometimes given in tandem.
The state of 9 million people has reported 24,896 residents have died from complications related to COVID-19 — 22,323 confirmed deaths and 2,573 fatalities considered probable.
VACCINATIONS BY COUNTY
  • ATLANTIC COUNTY – 172,439 doses administered
  • BERGEN COUNTY – 611,250 doses administered
  • BURLINGTON COUNTY – 287,286 doses administered
  • CAMDEN COUNTY – 323,235 doses administered
  • CAPE MAY COUNTY – 71,167 doses administered
  • CUMBERLAND COUNTY – 75,473 doses administered
  • ESSEX COUNTY – 420,077 doses administered
  • GLOUCESTER COUNTY – 195,216 doses administered
  • HUDSON COUNTY – 321,371 doses administered
  • HUNTERDON COUNTY – 77,417 doses administered
  • MERCER COUNTY – 215,823 doses administered
  • MIDDLESEX COUNTY – 466,828 doses administered
  • MONMOUTH COUNTY – 399,650 doses administered
  • MORRIS COUNTY – 381,528 doses administered
  • OCEAN COUNTY – 250,278 doses administered
  • PASSAIC COUNTY – 324,540 doses administered
  • SALEM COUNTY – 34,218 doses administered
  • SOMERSET COUNTY – 221,761 doses administered
  • SUSSEX COUNTY – 84,742 doses administered
  • UNION COUNTY – 293,483 doses administered
  • WARREN COUNTY – 54,713 doses administered
  • UNKNOWN COUNTY – 22,968 doses administered
  • OUT OF STATE – 134,795 doses administered
COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new cases)
  • Middlesex County: 81,008 confirmed cases (220 new), 1,993 confirmed deaths (245 probable)
  • Bergen County: 84,265 confirmed cases (204 new), 2,470 confirmed deaths (294 probable)
  • Essex County: 81,440 confirmed cases (193 new), 2,528 confirmed deaths (291 probable)
  • Hudson County: 75,351 confirmed cases (167 new), 1,953 confirmed deaths (203 probable)
  • Passaic County: 60,883 confirmed cases (164 new), 1,629 confirmed deaths (194 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 64,035 confirmed cases (160 new), 1,391 confirmed deaths (137 probable)
  • Camden County: 45,188 confirmed cases (137 new), 1,142 confirmed deaths (97 probable)
  • Ocean County: 62,590 confirmed cases (118 new), 1,882 confirmed deaths (155 probable)
  • Union County: 57,085 confirmed cases (112 new), 1,666 confirmed deaths (216 probable)
  • Morris County: 39,975 confirmed cases (97 new), 950 confirmed deaths (241 probable)
  • Burlington County: 35,975 confirmed cases (85 new), 743 confirmed deaths (63 probable)
  • Mercer County: 30,016 confirmed cases (82 new), 870 confirmed deaths (43 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 24,522 confirmed cases (79 new), 556 confirmed deaths (30 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 23,419 confirmed cases (76 new), 599 confirmed deaths (35 probable)
  • Somerset County: 22,789 confirmed cases (45 new), 706 confirmed deaths (105 probable)
  • Sussex County: 10,680 confirmed cases (43 new), 222 confirmed deaths (66 probable)
  • Warren County: 8,103 confirmed cases (33 new), 204 confirmed deaths (25 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 13,597 confirmed cases (21 new), 375 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 8,162 confirmed cases (19 new), 117 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Cape May County: 4,291 confirmed cases (9 new), 169 confirmed deaths (30 probable)
  • Salem County: 4,954 confirmed cases (5 new), 158 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
HOSPITALIZATIONS
There were 2,261 patients hospitalized with confirmed (2,150) or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Sunday night — 35 fewer than the previous night.
That included 448 in critical or intensive care (seven fewer than the night before), with 241 on ventilators (eight fewer more).
There were also 233 COVID-19 patients discharged Sunday.
By comparison, hospitalizations peaked at more than 8,300 patients during the first wave of the pandemic in April.
SCHOOL CASES
New Jersey has reported 240 in-school coronavirus outbreaks, which have resulted in 1,070 cases among students, teachers and school staff this academic year, according to the state’s dashboard.
The state defines school outbreaks as cases where contact tracers determined two or more students or school staff caught or transmitted COVID-19 in the classroom or during academic activities at school. Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
There are about 1.4 million public school students and teachers across the state, though teaching methods amid the outbreak have varied, with some schools teaching in-person, some using a hybrid format and others remaining all-remote.
Murphy recently announced most New Jersey schools can move classroom desks three feet apart, instead of six feet, under new social distancing guidelines.
The governor also said the state’s schools will return to full in-person classes for the next school year and districts will not be allowed to offer virtual learning, even for parents who want that option due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns. But Murphy clarified that students and teachers who have health issues that could put them at greater risk of a serious coronavirus case will have a virtual option.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (30.9%), followed by those 50-64 (22.9%), 18-29 (19.8%), 65-79 (10.4%), 5-17 (9.4%), 80 and older (4.6%) and 0-4 (1.9%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with preexisting conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (46.87%), followed by those 65-79 (32.89%), 50-64 (15.78%), 30-49 (4.05%), 18-29 (0.39%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.03%).
At least 7,989 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
There are active outbreaks at 225 facilities, resulting in 3,676 active cases among residents and 4,366 among staffers. Those numbers have been slowing as vaccinations continue at the facilities.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Monday, there have been more than 136 million positive COVID-19 tests across the world, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 2.9 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.
The U.S. has reported the most cases, at more than 31.2 million, and the most deaths, at more than 562,000.