Categories
Covid-19 State News

35K in N.J. likely had active COVID-19 infections on day before Thanksgiving, experts say

More than 35,000 people in New Jersey likely had active coronavirus infections last week on the day before Thanksgiving, according to projections from a group of experts from Columbia University.

The numbers come from a team led by epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman. They projected that New Jersey would add 4,579 reported cases on Wednesday, and that number ended up being 4,565.

The group says that of the 35,160 probable active infections, many will never be counted because people won’t show symptoms or will fear having to miss work or be isolated from friends and family.

The largest number of active infections come in the state’s big population centers. Bergen, Passaic, Union and Essex counties lead the list.
However, after adjusting for population, while Passaic County is still at the top, two South Jersey hotspots — Salem and Cape May — jump up near the top of the list.
On the whole, the researchers say New Jersey has 395.8 active infections per 100,000 people.
The group led by Shaman generates the figures using county-level data compiled by Johns Hopkins University and USAFACTS based on a range of scenarios describing a variety of changes in transmission rates.
“It’s bad; it’s really, really bad,” Shaman said last week to The Washington Post. “We’re running into Thanksgiving now and that’s only going to make it worse. We’re going to go through a lot of people being infected between now and the end of the year, unfortunately.”
Categories
Sports

N.J. high school football scoreboard: Complete Week 9 scores through Saturday, Nov. 28

The final week of New Jersey’s 2020 high school football season is in the books.

Below are the week’s results from all corners of the state. Nutley’s victory over Belleville brought the end to a memorable, chaotic season unlike anything the state had ever seen.

Saturday, Nov. 28

SFC

Bergen Catholic 22, St. Peter’s Prep 15

Nutley 42, Belleville 7

Morris Catholic 55, Whippany Park 22

WJFL

Millville 35, Vineland 3

Gloucester 48, Gloucester Catholic 0

St. Joseph (Hamm.) 51, Burlington Township 31

Friday, Nov. 27

SFC

Irvington 38, Clifton 7

Caldwell 31, Parsippany 14

Thursday, Nov. 26

WJFL

Highland 28, Triton 0

Holy Spirit 39, Atlantic City 0

Pitman 13, Clayton 12

Woodbury 37, Gateway 10

Salem 14, Woodstown 10

Hamilton West 22, Steinert 6

Wednesday, Nov. 25

BIG CENTRAL

Rahway 21, St. Joseph (Met.) 14

New Providence 35, Gov. Livingston 14

Ridge 44, Livingston 21

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 35, Colonia 7

Brearley 40, Metuchen 0

Bound Brook 35, Pemberton 12

Bernards 49, Immaculata 6

NJIC

Wallington 28, Emerson Boro 14

North Arlington 43, Secaucus 8

SFC

Northern Highlands 14, Old Tappan 0

Ridge 44, Livingston 21

Paterson Eastside 28, Paterson Kennedy 12

West Essex 19, Hanover Park 13

St. Joseph (Mont.) 20, DePaul 9

Bernards 49, Immaculata 6

SHORE

Southern 36, Pinelands 15

Manasquan 27, Long Branch 13

St. John Vianney 35, Lacey 14

WJFL

Middle Township 28, Lower Cape May 7

Penns Grove 20, West Deptford 14

St. Augustine 27, Lenape 20

Hammonton 30, Shawnee 21

Williamstown 28, Ocean City 6

Bound Brook 35, Pemberton 12

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 4,100 new COVID-19 cases, 19 deaths as hospitalizations decline for 2nd day in a row

New Jersey on Friday reported another 4,100 new cases of the coronavirus and 19 additional deaths as Gov. Phil Murphy warned the state is “still in the midst of this pandemic” and urged people to protect themselves.

While the number of new cases has risen above 4,000 for 10 of the past 14 days, the number of people hospitalized dropped slightly for the second day in a row and the rate of transmission monitoring the spread of the virus also ticked down from 1.21 on Thursday to 1.18.

But any number above one means the virus is still spreading and New Jersey’s 7-day rolling average is 4,199 — the highest to date. It’s up 7.9% since last week, and 213% since last month.

Though the seven-day average of cases has been higher than the pandemic’s first wave, the comparison can be deceiving because the state was conducting less than 12,000 tests a day in the spring and the outbreak was likely undercounted. The state is now averaging around 45,000 tests a day, and that does not include recently deployed rapid tests.

There have now been a total of 326,473 cases in the state and 16,942 deaths, which includes 15,113 lab-confirmed deaths and 1,829 deemed probable.

Fifteen of New Jersey’s 21 counties reported at least 100 new cases led by Bergen County with 535 positive tests.

The latest numbers were reported a day after Thanksgiving, when Murphy urged families not to get together to avoid the spread of the virus.
He announced Wednesday that New Jersey is abandoning the state-by-state formula it has used the last five months to determine its travel quarantine advisory formula, as virtually the entire country qualified for the list. Instead, he said anybody traveling to any places that aren’t neighboring states should abide by a 14-day quarantine.
Officials say initial doses of a coronavirus vaccine could arrive in New Jersey by Christmas, with priority going to vulnerable residents and health care workers. But a larger rollout could happen by April or May.
Still, Murphy has warned the next few months will be “brutal” as more people head indoors because of the colder weather and with the stretch of winter holidays ahead. Officials are calling on residents to keep wearing masks, practicing social distancing, washing hands and limiting gatherings.
Murphy has also said the state is trying to use more “surgical” restrictions to fight the spread, but he has not ruled out another statewide shutdown like he ordered in the spring.
The governor has also said its goal is to keep as much in-person learning at schools as possible.

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new cases)

  • Bergen County: 33,875 positive tests (535 new), 1,872 confirmed deaths (250 probable)
  • Camden County: 18,378 positive tests (372 new), 617 confirmed deaths (57 probable)
  • Essex County: 34,478 positive tests (331 new), 1,993 confirmed deaths (233 probable)
  • Hudson County: 30,746 positive tests (323 new), 1,413 confirmed deaths (159 probable)
  • Middlesex County: 29,602 positive tests (303 new), 1,281 confirmed deaths (205 probable)
  • Ocean County: 21,303 positive tests (293 new), 1,046 confirmed deaths (68 probable)
  • Passaic County: 29,148 positive tests (292 new), 1,167 confirmed deaths (144 probable)
  • Union County: 27,709 positive tests (256 new), 1,262 confirmed deaths (170 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 19,918 positive tests (225 new), 806 confirmed deaths (92 probable)
  • Burlington County: 13,217 positive tests (197 new), 499 confirmed deaths (44 probable)
  • Morris County: 13,159 positive tests (175 new), 712 confirmed deaths (147 probable)
  • Mercer County: 13,414 positive tests (145 new), 622 confirmed deaths (37 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 8,711 positive tests (137 new), 269 confirmed deaths (7 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 7,754 positive tests (110 new), 270 confirmed deaths (14 probable)
  • Somerset County: 8,839 positive tests (108 new), 534 confirmed deaths (75 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 4,999 positive tests (61 new), 165 confirmed deaths (8 probable)
  • Sussex County: 2,475 positive tests (41 new), 162 confirmed deaths (37 probable)
  • Warren County: 2,414 positive tests (40 new), 160 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 2,380 positive tests (34 new), 77 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Salem County: 1,580 positive tests (29 new), 87 confirmed deaths (5 probable)
  • Cape May County: 1,627 positive tests (23 new), 99 confirmed deaths (10 probable)

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The number of people being hospitalized dropped slightly Thursday night for the second day in a row in after more than a month of steady increases.
There were 2,796 patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Thanksgiving evening. That’s 67 fewer patients compared to Wednesday. There were 2,902 people being hospitalized on Tuesday, the most since May 22.
Of those Thursday evening patients, 559 were in critical or intensive care (four fewer than the night before), including 279 on ventilators (nine fewer).
There were 432 coronavirus patients discharged from hospitals Thursday, according to the state’s online dashboard.
Hospitalizations related to COVID-19 have more than tripled over the past month.
Officials say hospitals are now better equipped to treat patients than they were in the spring and are confident they will have enough capacity. But they warn the more cases rise, the more likely hospitalizations — and eventually deaths — will keep growing.
SCHOOL CASES
Although hundreds of school districts have announced coronavirus cases and dozens of New Jersey schools have temporarily shut down since the start of the school year, state health officials have said 66 schools have had confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks.

Murphy on Tuesday announced 10 new in-school outbreaks over the past week. There have now been 269 total cases of in-school transmission in those 66 schools since the start of the school year.

Those numbers do not include students or staff believed to have been infected outside school, or cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (31.6%), followed by those 50-64 (24.5%), 18-29 (18.6%), 65-79 (11.6%), 80 and older (6.8%), 5-17 (5.5%) and 0-4 (1.1%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with pre-existing conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (47.1%), followed by those 65-79 (32.2%), 50-64 (16%), 30-49 (4.3%), 18-29 (0.4%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.02%).
At least 7,281 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. That number has been rising again at a steeper rate in recent weeks.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Friday morning, there were more than 61.16 million positive COVID-19 tests across the world, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 1.43 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.

The U.S. has reported the most cases (more than 12.89 million) and the most deaths (more than 263,500).

Categories
Sports

The NHL and the New Jersey Devils are Eerily Quiet Right Now

It’s November 27th; the day after Thanksgiving in the United States. With just over a month left in the awful year that 2020 has been, word from the NHL on the 2021 season has seemingly dried up. Oh sure, there’s been bits and pieces here and then about trying to keep the January 1st start date, the salaries of players and realignment (all handily recapped here in one article), but in terms of clear communication for moving forward, there’s been a lot of room for improvement.

It just feels as though a setback is inevitable at this point, because there isn’t a clear plan yet (at least not one that has been shared publicly), and training camps usually start roughly a month before the season. Right now, we don’t have any training camps going, and no teams have mentioned them starting anytime soon. Including our New Jersey Devils.

The Devils, for the organization’s part, have done their best to stay active on social media and to provide fresh content to their fans. While a lot of it has been related to past Devils teams, it makes sense due to their being no tangible evidence of a season (or even pre-season) start date. The only news we have that seems to indicate training camps and a season could be upon us is Jesper Boqvist being recalled from his loan.

In terms of actual hockey updates since then, however, the Devils have gone quiet too. MacKenzie Blackwood and Jesper Bratt are seemingly important pieces of the team’s future, yet Tuesday will mark the beginning of December and both of these players are still without a contract. While they are restricted free agents, and not really in danger of being lost, it’s surprising that with how few other moves the Devils made, that they didn’t lock up what should be key future pieces within the past month and a half.

While I firmly believe there will be a 2021 season, it’s a matter of this almost radio silence that makes me feel as though there’s going to be a delay. With only 34 more days in this calendar year, there’s still a lot of variables and logistics that have not been addressed in terms of the season itself, let alone all of the usual necessities that take place prior to a season.

And there’s also the matter of safety, which we’ve yet to bring up. In the above article featuring all of the league news, Bruins GM Don Sweeney mentions a possible vaccine, which would be one way to help protect the players. The issue is that timeline is also uncertain, leaving a need for other ways to keep players and staff safe. When the NHL restarted this summer, the players were all brought to two cities to play out the season as we all know. Now teams will be travelling as they did previously (albeit to fewer locations) which could see more potential exposure. Anyone who has followed the NFL or MLB has seen how an outbreak among a team can derail even the best laid plans.

I think the NHL is taking their time here and they’ve purposefully gone dark for a bit in terms of the season start because they’ve seen how other leagues have dealt with these issues. The NHL seemingly prided themselves on how well they tackled a Covid-19 world when they were in the bubble, and I feel they want to be as close to that success as possible with the 2021 season. There’s definitely care being taken; but the lack of transparency for fans is still a bit worrisome, as any uncertainty surrounding what is a favorite sport for many of us usually is.

As per our Devils, if they could go ahead and sign the guys pictured above to new contracts already, yeah, that’d be great. In seriousness, I think the Devils need a solid start date for camp worse than some other teams. Not just because last season was an utter bust, but because there’s so many new parts (including a coaching staff) to be incorporated. The Devils need as much time as possible to see what works and what doesn’t while also again navigating any new protocols for this year. 2021 will be a challenge for sure, but hopefully it will be way better than 2020….both less importantly in terms of the team’s on-ice performance and more importantly in terms of global health and safety.

What are your thoughts on the current lack of news surrounding the 2021 season? Do you think there will be a start date delay or worse? Would you like the Devils to get Bratt and Blackwood under contract ASAP? How important is it for the Devils to get training camp going soon? Leave any and all comments below and thanks as always for reading!

Categories
Crime & Safety State News

Sussex County Woman Charged with Concealing Terrorist Financing to Syrian Al-Nusra Front, a Foreign Terrorist Organization

NEWARK, N.J. – A Sussex County, New Jersey, woman, was arrested at her home today in connection with concealing sending money to a Syrian foreign terrorist organization, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito announced.

Maria Bell, a/k/a “Maria Sue Bell,” 53, of Hopatcong, New Jersey, is charged by complaint with one count of knowingly concealing the provision of material support or resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization. She is scheduled to appear by videoconference this afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Cathy L. Waldor.

According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:

From February of 2017, Bell used encrypted applications to communicate with and provide advice to fighters based in Syria who were members of the al-Nusra Front (ANF), also known by other aliases, including Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), fighting the Assad regime. Bell communicated with and provided money to one self-identified member of HTS based in Syria, identified in the complaint as “User 1.”  Bell sent currency to User 1 via Western Union, using an intermediary to conceal the source of the funds, and also provided him advice on weapons and ammunition.

In communications with HTS fighters, Bell cited her professional experience – including her specialized weapons training while on active duty in the U.S. Army and Army National Guard – to provide guidance concerning operational security issues, firearms purchases, and military knowledge. She had thousands of encrypted communications with User 1 about operational planning and provided details with regard to concealing payments sent to User 1.

User 1 made his status as an HTS fighter clear. In one communication, Bell and User 1 discussed User 1’s pledge to HTS and the ongoing Syrian conflict. Bell stated: “If Assad wins, mujahideen will be persecuted again,” and “If Assad wins, I cannot get a visa into Syria. I cannot come to you.” In the same communication, the defendant later asked User 1 if he was ready to fight:

Bell:    Are you ready to fight in front line with other fighters? You are no longer young child like you used to be.

Bell:    It will be frightening. But I am with you

In another communication, User 1, after discussing U.S. support for the Syrian regime, which HTS and other groups were fighting at the time, stated: “If you want to hit the Syrian airports, we will return to revenge within New York.” Later in the encrypted communication, Bell states “If there were ever an attack in New York, all Muslims and helpers like me will be arrested….”

Bell provided advice to User 1 regarding the purchase of a firearm and ammunition for User 1. They discussed the cost and type of weapons that would be good for User 1, in addition to various types of ammunition.

Bell also wired money, often at the direction of User 1, to individuals in Turkey and Syria who are supporters of HTS, knowing that the funds would support acts of terrorism by HTS. The defendant concealed the nature, location, and ownership of payments, sending at least 18 payments totaling $3,150 to several accounts used by User-1’s associates. In one communication, she expressed concern that her transfers could be tracked by U.S. law enforcement:

Bell:    But I will not have my account watched more closely than it is already.

Bell:    Each time I withdraw money, it is noted because Western Union is trying to track fraud and terrorists for the government.

The charge of concealment of terrorist financing to a designated foreign terrorist organization carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000.

U.S. Attorney Carpenito credited special agents of the FBI and task force officers of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr., and special agents of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Investigations, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Jason J. Molina in Newark, with the investigation leading to today’s charges.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dean C. Sovolos of the U.S. Attorney’s Office National Security Unit and Trial Attorney Brenda Sue Thornton of the Department of Justice, National Security Division.

The charge and allegations contained in the complaint are merely accusations, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Categories
Lifestyle

7 signs your partner is likely to cheat or is already cheating

Many breakups are a result of infidelity. It is never the same after confirming that your partner has cheated on you. But, first thing first. How do you tell if your partner is cheating on you? What are the signs that your better half is likely to cheat? This is what we shall look at in this post.

But before that,

Can a Tarot Reading Help Tell if Your Partner is a Cheater?

People seek the help of tarot card readers to get answers regarding their relationship. And yes, getting a tarot reading can help you know if your partner is unfaithful.

Specifically, cheating tarot cards will help shed light on your relationship. The common tarot cheat cards include The Moon, The High Priestess, The Tower, The Fool, The 2 of Pentacles, etc.

Since each of these cards means a different thing, find a professional reader who reads tarot cards for cheating and infidelity to help you out.

Signs of cheating vary. Nevertheless, if you notice any of these signs, there’s a high chance that your partner is likely or is already cheating on you.

1. They are Jealous and Anxious

Does your partner get anxious and jealous easily? If yes, it could be a sign they will cheat on you. Although some people become jealous for fear of losing their partners, there is a probability that they might be insecure when you are around other people.

If you have been in a relationship for a while and you have noticed an increase in jealousy, it’s high time you investigate whether he is cheating.

2. They are Hiding Things on Their Phone

When someone is about to cheat or is already cheating, a phone or an iPad is one of the platforms for communication. If their phone rings or they receive a message and you notice they have panicked, something is off.

If it was not a problem to check their emails before, but now they don’t want you near their phone, there is something wrong.

Watch out if your partner is becoming more private with their gadgets or is deleting messages more than before. After all, in a transparent relationship, there is no need to clear calls and browsing history!

3. Friends Behaving Differently

In any case of infidelity, the betrayed is always the last to know. Most of your partner’s friends are aware of the betrayal long before you do. In most cases, your friends too are aware but unable to let you know about it.

Knowing that your relationship is about to get messy, some friends tend to keep off or behave weirdly when around you. On the other hand, you may notice some friends being too nice and sometimes shy away from any conversation regarding your partner.

4. Unexplained Expenses

Infidelity is expensive. From drinks to gifts to dinners to hotel rooms, the cost is too much. Check out for unexplained withdrawals from your or your partner’s account.

Ask for an explanation to verify if the withdrawals were necessary. If you think they are lying, try to investigate why the money was withdrawn before concluding.

5. Change in Appearance

If you notice a change in fashion, haircut, eating healthily, or sudden exercises, you may need to look deeper. They may be trying to appear attractive to someone else or to fit someone’s description of the desired partner. If your partner looks ordinary when around you and looks super cool when going out, there is a probability they are cheating.

6. Lack of Intimacy

When did you and your partner go out for dinner or to have fun? If it has been quite a while and you were the kind to roll around the hay, then he is pulling back. If there is nothing you are aware of that is causing the distance between the both of you, something is wrong.

When someone is cheating, they don’t need anything from their partner because they will be catered for elsewhere. They could also be more caring and loving trying to hide their guilt from their partner.

If you feel as if your partner is pulling back or is being too romantic, try to find out why.

7. They are Untraceable

If you are in a relationship for some time, it’s likely you know each other’s schedule. If your partner is not where they are supposed to be, ask why. When someone is on anything shady, they keep on lying about their whereabouts.

Before concluding if your partner is a cheater or trying to be one, try to have a conversation about your fears or doubts.

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. school district going all-remote for 7 weeks amid COVID-19 surge

The Mount Olive school district is switching to all-remote learning for seven weeks starting next Monday.

It is among the growing number of school districts in New Jersey opting to keep students out of classrooms as coronavirus cases surge throughout the state.

Mount Olive drew notice in early March, about a week before all schools closed statewide, upon closing for a day in order to prepare for long-term virtual instruction.

The K-12 district has six school buildings and enrolls 4,600 students. Approximately 500 students who receive specialized services, including students with disabilities, will have the option to continue receiving in-person instruction, Schools Superintendent Robert Zywicki said.
Teachers will continue reporting to school buildings while providing virtual instruction from their classrooms. They will be wearing masks and following social-distancing guidelines, Zywicki said.
“We’re trying to keep kids and staff as safe as possible,” Zywicki told NJ Advance Media on Tuesday.
In making the announcement via a video posted Monday to the school district’s website. Zywicki said that, during the past three weeks, the district has endured “a rise in cases necessitating the quarantining of 50 staff members, scores of students and three athletic teams.”
“The quarantining of staff and students, as well as the constant daily contract tracing, are an immense burden on the district’s operations,” Zywicki said on the video.
Mount Olive’s health director, Trevor Weigle, also appeared on the video and said there have been more than 500 confirmed coronavirus cases among the township’s 28,000 residents, including 70 currently isolated at home.

Zywicki said on the video that “three of our six schools have had to switch to all-remote learning because of positive cases.”

Contacted Tuesday, Zywicki said that two schools — the Chester M. Stephens Elementary School and Tinc Road School — reopened on Monday after being closed for two weeks. A third, the Sandshore Elementary School, closed over the weekend.

The switch to all-remote learning will begin Monday, Nov. 23, three days before Thanksgiving, and will continue until Jan. 19.
At least a dozen school districts in New Jersey have announced they are staying with, or switching to, all-remote learning until January — and possibly longer.
The list includes three of the state’s biggest school districts, in Jersey CityNewark and Paterson.
With coronavirus cases are continuing to rise in New Jersey, the list seems likely to grow, though Gov. Phil Murphy has said he is not planning to order a statewide shutdown.
n Mount Olive, Zywicki said “an abundance of caution due to increased travel over the upcoming holidays” factored into the decision.
Categories
Lifestyle

Man leaves $3K tip for a beer as restaurant closes for virus

CLEVELAND — A customer left a $3,000 tip for a single beer as a restaurant voluntarily closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The man walked into Nighttown on Sunday in Cleveland, ordered the beer and asked for the check, which came to $7.02, owner Brendan Ring wrote on Facebook.

Ring said the man wished him well and told him to share the tip with the four employees who were working brunch service.

As the man walked out, Ring wrote, he looked down at the tip and “realized he left a whopping $3,000.”

“I ran after him and he said no mistake we will see you when you reopen!”

Ring said he would not post the customer’s name because he thinks the man wouldn’t want that.

The owner said he and his serving staff were “humbly grateful for this incredibly kind and grand gesture.”

Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 4,679 new COVID-19 cases, 34 deaths as hospitalizations mount

As the second wave of the coronavirus pandemic continues to barrage New Jersey, state officials on Saturday reported 4,679 more coronavirus cases, the most in a single day since the state’s first case, along with 34 additional deaths.

On Saturday, New Jersey reported 4,679 new cases, the most since the outbreak of coronavirus hit New Jersey in March. The record number is painted by the fact that testing was more far scarce in the spring, during the first wave of the virus.

Along with the single-day record for cases, hospitalizations rose for the 22nd straight day in the Garden State.

A day after Newark’s mayor announced the state’s largest city will ask residents to stay at home for 10 days beginning the day before Thanksgiving, Gov. Phil Murphy did not announce new restrictions Saturday to combat the second wave.
But Murphy, echoing top federal infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci’s predictions, warned the next few months will be difficult. The governor said numbers will get “unequivocally worse” as more people head inside because of the colder weather, even though New Jersey has significantly increased testing.
Officials continued to urge residents to wear masks, practice social distancing, wash hands, and keep the upcoming string of holiday celebrations small.
“The numbers speak for themselves. Please take this seriously. Wear a mask. Social distance. Avoid large gatherings,” Murphy said on Twitter.
On a bright note, officials on Friday also announced New Jersey could could get up to 160,000 doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine by Christmas if the company wins emergency use approval from the federal government.
And if Moderna’s vaccine takes a similar path, that could mean a total of 460,000 vaccine doses in the state by early January, while broader rollout to the general population could come by April or May.

New Jersey has now announced 302,039 total positive tests out of more than 5.5 million tests administered since the start of the outbreak in March.

The state of 9 million residents has reported 16,746 coronavirus deaths in that time, including 14,934 confirmed fatalities and 1,812 considered probable.
After Friday marked the first time in four days New Jersey reported fewer than 4,000 new cases, cases shot back up past the benchmark Saturday.
The statewide seven-day average for new positive tests increased to 3,933— up 23% from a week ago and 278% in a month.
The seven-day average of cases is now higher than the pandemic’s first wave, though the comparison is deceiving because the state was conducting less than 12,000 tests a day then and the outbreak was likely undercounted.
The state is averaging about 45,000 tests a day this month, and that number does not include recently deployed rapid tests.
Murphy reminded residents that more than 400 testing sites are available throughout the state.
Still, key numbers health officials use to track the outbreak keep trending in the wrong direction.
There were 2,552 patients with confirmed or suspected coronavirus cases in New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Friday night. That’s much lower than the 8,000 who were hospitalized in April but the most since May 28. Hospitalizations have nearly tripled over the last month.

Of the 2,552 patients, 486 were in intensive or critical care and 232 were on ventilators. Despite 305 discharges on Friday, it was the 22nd day of increases.

The positivity rate for tests conducted Tuesday, the most recent day available, was 8.66%. The rate throughout last week had remained above 8% after having been below 4% through the summer.
The latest statewide rate of transmission dropped to 1.38. Any number above 1 means the outbreak is continuing to expand. New Jersey has been above that mark since early September.
Fourteen of 21 counties reported at least 100 new cases on Saturday led by Essex (536), Camden (435) and Bergen (427) counties.
The state did not announce when the 34 newly reported deaths occurred.
The update comes as coronavirus cases, deaths, and hospitalizations surge in the United States, and wait times and long lines at testing sites have increased dramatically.
Murphy has previously said New Jersey’s figures are increasing because people have fatigue over observing virus restrictions like wearing masks and are gathering more indoors as the weather gets colder, especially inside private homes.
To fight the spread, Murphy has ordered indoor bars and restaurants in New Jersey to close at 10 p.m. daily and canceled interstate indoor sports up the high school level. Indoor gatherings are now limited to 10 people, down from 25, and starting Monday, outdoor gatherings will be limited to 150, down from 500.

Murphy has stopped short of ordering another statewide shutdown like he did in the spring but has stressed that all options remain on the table.

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new)
  • Essex County: 32,441 positive tests (536 new), 1,968 confirmed deaths (230 probable)
  • Camden County: 16,540 positive tests (435 new), 608 confirmed deaths (56 probable)
  • Bergen County: 31,447 positive tests (427 new), 1,855 confirmed deaths (246 probable)
  • Passaic County: 26,806 positive tests (404 new), 1,155 confirmed deaths (144 probable)
  • Hudson County: 28,764 positive tests (393 new), 1,399 confirmed deaths (158 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 18,335 positive tests (332 new), 795 confirmed deaths (92 probable)
  • Union County: 25,763 positive tests (288 new), 1,246 confirmed deaths (171 probable)
  • Burlington County: 11,699 positive tests (284 new), 490 confirmed deaths (41 probable)
  • Middlesex County: 27,671 positive tests (260 new), 1,271 confirmed deaths (203 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 7,947 positive tests (235 new), 258 confirmed deaths (7 probable)
  • Ocean County: 19,880 positive tests (233 new), 1,029 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Morris County: 12,085 positive tests (202 new), 707 confirmed deaths (147 probable)
  • Mercer County: 12,257 positive tests (166 new), 615 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 7,162 positive tests (137 new), 265 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Somerset County: 8,251 positive tests (99 new), 532 confirmed deaths (75 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 4,689 positive tests (54 new), 162 confirmed deaths (8 probable)
  • Sussex County: 2,278 positive tests (34 new), 162 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Warren County: 2,215 positive tests (34 new), 160 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 2,186 positive tests (31 new), 76 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Cape May County: 1,516 positive tests (22 new), 95 confirmed deaths (10 probable)
  • Salem County: 1,457 positive tests (17 new), 86 confirmed deaths (5 probable)

HOSPITALIZATIONS

There were 2,505 patients with confirmed (2,272) or suspected (233) COVID-19 cases across the New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Wednesday night. That’s 34 more than the night before.
Of those, 452 in critical or intensive care (four fewer than the night before), including 233 on ventilators (17 more).
There were 333 coronavirus patients admitted and 290 discharged Monday, according to the state’s online dashboard.
New Jersey’s 71 acute-care hospitals are currently two-thirds full, according to the New Jersey Hospital Association. Patient ages have tended to be younger, making for shorter hospital stays, and hospitals have become better at treating the virus.
TRANSMISSION RATE
New Jersey’s latest transmission rate of 1.38 is down from the 1.40 reported Friday.
That’s far lower than when the rate was above 5 toward the end of March as the extent of the outbreak was still coming into focus and testing was scarce.
But any number above 1 means each newly-infected person, on average, is spreading the virus to at least one other person. Any number below 1 means the outbreak is decreasing.
A transmission rate of 1.38 means every 100 infected people will spread the virus to 138 others.

Although hundreds of school districts have announced coronavirus cases and dozens of New Jersey schools have temporarily shut down since the start of the school year, state health officials have said 56 schools have had confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks.

The state’s dashboard shows 239 cases in those 56 schools, but those numbers only include confirmed in-school transmissions. Students or staff believed to have been infected outside school, or those cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks are not included.
Murphy has resisted ordering schools to close statewide, saying those numbers are better than expected.
AGE BREAKDOWN
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (31.6%), followed by those 50-64 (24.6%), 18-29 (18.5%), 65-79 (11.7%), 80 and older (7.0%), 5-17 (5.4%), and 0-4 (1.1%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with pre-existing conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (47.1%), followed by those 65-79 (32.2%), 50-64 (16%), 30-49 (4.3%), 18-29 (0.4%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.02%).
At least 7,274 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. That number has also been rising at a steeper rate in recent weeks.

Meanwhile, at least 17,500 more people in New Jersey have died this year than would be expected, state mortality data shows, which suggests the pandemic has claimed even more lives than state totals, according to an ongoing analysis by NJ Advance Media.

GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Saturday morning, there have been more than 57.7 million positive COVID-19 tests across the globe, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 1.37 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.
The United States has the most positive tests in the world, with more than 11.9 million, and the most deaths, at more than 254,473.
Categories
Covid-19 State News

N.J. reports 3,635 new COVID-19 cases, 23 deaths as hospitals continue to see surge in patients

New Jersey on Friday reported 3,635 more coronavirus cases and 23 additional deaths, while hospitalizations rose for the 21st straight day as the second wave of the pandemic continues.

On a positive note, officials also announced New Jersey could could get up to 160,000 doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine by Christmas if the company wins emergency use approval from the federal government.

And if Moderna’s vaccine takes a similar path, that could mean a total of 460,000 vaccine doses in the state by early January, while broader rollout to the general population could come by April or May.

In the meantime, Gov. Phil Murphy did not announce new restrictions Friday to battle the second wave — even though Newark’s mayor announced the state’s largest city will ask residents to stay at home for 10 days beginning the day before Thanksgiving.

But Murphy warned the next few months as we await a vaccine will be difficult. He said numbers will get “unequivocally worse” as more people head inside because of the colder weather, even though in the state has significantly increased testing.
Officials continued to urge residents to wear masks, practice social distancing, wash hands, and keep the upcoming string of holiday celebrations small.
“Between personal responsibility and exceptional New Jersey behavior and more testing and vaccines that are real … you start looking at distribution as early as next month and April and May broad access, we’re in a completely different place (than the first wave in the spring),” Murphy said at his latest coronavirus briefing in Trenton.
“This is crunch time,” he added. “This is the locker room. The next six to eight weeks are the Super Bowl. We’ve got to win in.”
New Jersey has now announced 297,370 total positive tests out of more than 5.5 million tests administered since the start of the outbreak in March.
The state of 9 million residents has reported 16,712 coronavirus deaths in that time, including 14,900 confirmed fatalities and 1,812 considered probable.
Friday marked the first time in four days New Jersey reported fewer than 4,000 new cases. But the statewide seven-day average for new positive tests increased to 3,892 — up 29% from a week ago and 278% from a month earlier.

The seven-day average of cases is now higher than the pandemic’s first wave, though the comparison is deceiving because the state was conducting less than 12,000 tests a day then and the outbreak was likely undercounted. The state is averaging about 45,000 tests a day this month, and that number does not include recently deployed rapid tests.

Murphy reminded residents that more than 400 testing sites are available throughout the state.
Still, key numbers health officials use to track the outbreak keep trending in the wrong direction.
There were 2,505 patients with confirmed (2,272) or suspected (233) coronavirus cases in New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Thursday night. That’s much lower than the 8,000 who were hospitalized in April but the most since May 28. Hospitalizations have nearly tripled over the last month.

The positivity rate for tests conducted Monday, the most recent day available, was 7.98% — which Murphy said was “a little bit better.“ The rate throughout last week had remained above 8% after having been below 4% through the summer.

The latest statewide rate of transmission dropped to 1.40. Any number above 1 means the outbreak is continuing to expand. New Jersey has been above that mark since early September.
Thirteen of 21 counties reported at least 100 new cases on Friday led by Passaic (386), Essex (343) and Bergen (338) counties.
The state did not announce when the 23 newly reported deaths occurred.
The update comes as coronavirus cases, deaths, and hospitalizations surge all over the United States.

Murphy has said New Jersey’s figures are increasing because people have fatigue over observing virus restrictions like wearing masks and are gathering more indoors as the weather gets colder, especially inside private homes.

To fight the spread, Murphy has ordered indoor bars and restaurants in New Jersey to close at 10 p.m. daily and canceled interstate indoor sports up the high school level. Indoor gatherings are now limited to 10 people, down from 25, and starting Monday, outdoor gatherings will be limited to 150, down from 500.
Murphy has stopped short of ordering another statewide shutdown like he did in the spring but has stressed that all options remain on the table.
He also suggested Friday it’s irresponsible to close indoor dining or nonessential retail stores without more federal aid, saying you’d “be putting a bullet in them” and there “would be blood on our hands.”
COUNTY-BY-COUNTY NUMBERS (sorted by most new)
  • Passaic County: 26,415 positive tests (386 new), 1,152 confirmed deaths (144 probable)
  • Essex County: 31,902 positive tests (343 new), 1,965 confirmed deaths (230 probable)
  • Bergen County: 31,006 positive tests (338 new), 1,852 confirmed deaths (246 probable)
  • Monmouth County: 18,006 positive tests (276 new), 792 confirmed deaths (92 probable)
  • Camden County: 16,103 positive tests (270 new), 604 confirmed deaths (56 probable)
  • Middlesex County: 27,418 positive tests (255 new), 1,269 confirmed deaths (203 probable)
  • Ocean County: 19,648 positive tests (254 new), 1,026 confirmed deaths (67 probable)
  • Hudson County: 28,370 positive tests (253 new), 1,396 confirmed deaths (158 probable)
  • Mercer County: 12,087 positive tests (217 new), 612 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Union County: 25,437 positive tests (196 new), 1,245 confirmed deaths (171 probable)
  • Burlington County: 11,411 positive tests (177 new), 489 confirmed deaths (41 probable)
  • Gloucester County: 7,718 positive tests (129 new), 256 confirmed deaths (7 probable)
  • Morris County: 11,883 positive tests (127 new), 707 confirmed deaths (147 probable)
  • Atlantic County: 7,023 positive tests (96 new), 263 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Somerset County: 8,146 positive tests (84 new), 532 confirmed deaths (75 probable)
  • Cumberland County: 4,636 positive tests (51 new), 162 confirmed deaths (8 probable)
  • Cape May County: 1,498 positive tests (45 new), 95 confirmed deaths (10 probable)
  • Hunterdon County: 2,155 positive tests (36 new), 75 confirmed deaths (54 probable)
  • Sussex County: 2,245 positive tests (36 new), 162 confirmed deaths (36 probable)
  • Warren County: 2,181 positive tests (25 new), 160 confirmed deaths (13 probable)
  • Salem County: 1,442 positive tests (17 new), 86 confirmed deaths (5 probable)

HOSPITALIZATIONS

There were 2,505 patients with confirmed (2,272) or suspected (233) COVID-19 cases across the New Jersey’s 71 hospitals as of Wednesday night. That’s 34 more than the night before.
Of those, 452 in critical or intensive care (four fewer than the night before), including 233 on ventilators (17 more).
There were 333 coronavirus patients admitted and 290 discharged Monday, according to the state’s online dashboard.
New Jersey’s 71 acute-care hospitals are currently two-thirds full, according to the New Jersey Hospital Association. Patient ages have tended to be younger, making for shorter hospital stays, and hospitals have become better at treating the virus.
TRANSMISSION RATE
New Jersey’s latest transmission rate of 1.40 is down from the 1.42 reported Thursday.
That’s far lower than when the rate was above 5 toward the end of March as the extent of the outbreak was still coming into focus and testing was scarce.
But any number above 1 means each newly-infected person, on average, is spreading the virus to at least one other person. Any number below 1 means the outbreak is decreasing.

A transmission rate of 1.40 means every 100 infected people will spread the virus to 140 others.

Although hundreds of school districts have announced coronavirus cases and dozens of New Jersey schools have temporarily shut down since the start of the school year, state health officials have said 56 schools have had confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks.
The state’s dashboard shows 239 cases in those 56 schools, but those numbers only include confirmed in-school transmissions. Students or staff believed to have been infected outside school, or those cases that can’t be confirmed as in-school outbreaks are not included.
Murphy has resisted ordering schools to close statewide, saying those numbers are better than expected.
“We take every one of those transmissions and every one of those cases deadly seriously,” he said Friday. “However, if you look at where the safest places to be (are), where contact tracing is as good as it gets, I think, outside of our hospitals and health care systems, it’s the schools. We know exactly who are in those buildings.”
That’s even though the state’s largest teachers union, the New Jersey Education Association, accused Murphy on Thursday of downplaying the risk of keeping schools open.
Broken down by age, those 30 to 49 years old make up the largest percentage of New Jersey residents who have caught the virus (31.6%), followed by those 50-64 (24.7%), 18-29 (18.5%), 65-79 (11.7%), 80 and older (7.1%), 5-17 (5.2%), and 0-4 (1.1%).
On average, the virus has been more deadly for older residents, especially those with pre-existing conditions. Nearly half the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents 80 and older (47.1%), followed by those 65-79 (32.2%), 50-64 (16%), 30-49 (4.3%), 18-29 (0.4%), 5-17 (0%) and 0-4 (0.02%).
At least 7,274 of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents and staff members at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. That number has also been rising at a steeper rate in recent weeks.
Meanwhile, at least 17,500 more people in New Jersey have died this year than would be expected, state mortality data shows, which suggests the pandemic has claimed even more lives than state totals, according to an ongoing analysis by NJ Advance Media.
GLOBAL NUMBERS
As of Friday morning, there have been more than 57.1 million positive COVID-19 tests across the globe, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University. More than 1.36 million people have died from coronavirus-related complications.

The United States has the most positive tests in the world, with more than 11.7 million, and the most deaths, at more than 252,800.